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MCSIAC’s procedure is a Pathogen Decontamination.Pathogens are microscopic organisms that cause or have the potential to cause disease. Different types of pathogens include bacteria, viruses, protists (amoeba, plasmodium, etc.), fungi, parasitic worms (flatworms and roundworms), and prions.

MCSIAC offers its Inspection and Testing services for pathogen (Mold/Fungus, Bacteria) decontamination projects. MCSIAC can measure a decontamination process effectiveness from a 3 Log (99.9%) disinfection to a 6 log (99.9999%) sterilization. For most, a 3 Log disinfecting is sufficient. 6 Log testing is required by the FDA for food processing plants, etc.

Pre-Pathogen survey is recommended to establish a base line of contamination level greater or less compared to a 99.9% level of cleanliness.

MCSIC offers Pre and Post ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) Testing to remediation contractors and others to ensure adequate reduction of biological contaminates following their remediation efforts. Post Testing using ATP is much less costly than a laboratory analysis (2 to 4 days for results). ATP results are fast (less than 5 minutes while on site). This allows for immediate correction of any surface that did not pass. Post Testing for pathogen decontamination is highly recommended. Without Post Testing, there is no proof or evidence that the decontamination service is satisfactory before re-occupancy of space.

Both Pre-Testing and Post-Testing provides on-site results. The overall reduction of biological contaminates is an excellent surrogate measure of cleanliness since selective cleaning of specific contaminates is impossible.

IMPORTANT FACTORS to consider about our GREEN Pathogen Decontamination procedure.

1. No toxic chemical residue.

2. Procedure disinfects the HVAC system complete, all surfaces in the air stream path.

3. Procedure disinfects all surfaces; carpet, all soft goods, fabrics, furniture, desks, and all hard surfaces (et all).

4. Post Testing: A useful process that provides on-site results is a sample collection of surface samples using ATP (adenosine triphosphate) Monitor. The overall reduction of biological contaminates is an excellent surrogate measure of cleanliness since selective cleaning of specific contaminates is impossible. For example: It is not possible to clean bacteria and leave behind just the virus.

5. CAUTION: The EPA N-List provides numerous chemicals for disinfection. Some affect the COVID-19 virus, and others do not. Check each chemical for its intended use and delivery method. Most chemicals on the list CANNOT be used on fabrics and in HVAC systems and CANNOT be fogged into the air. It is a VIOLATION OF FEDERAL LAW to use a chemical inconsistent with its labeling!!

Confirmed or Suspected Case(s) of Biological Contamination in Your Building

If it is determined that an employee, occupant, or visitor at your location has tested positive for Biological Contamination infection, or is suspected of being infected, immediately contact your state’s Department of Health or the CDC for guidance on initiating the proper response.

If you feel your facility may have been exposed to the Coronavirus or are struggling with the influenza virus, please contact Mold Control Solutions and Indoor Air Care (904) 887-0272 to schedule a consultation for disinfection services. You can also email us at michaeld.mcsiac@gmail.com.

As new data becomes available regarding SARS-CoV-2 and Biological Contamination, these recommendations will be modified accordingly.
The following recommendations are provided to address preventative measures that can be taken at public and private (residential and commercial) buildings and facilities where individuals tend to visit or congregate. This includes, but is not limited to:

  • retail spaces;
  • office buildings;
  • warehouses and distribution centers;
  • hotels;
  • retirement communities;
  • assisted living facilities;
  • apartment buildings/complexes;
  • grocery stores;
  • school buildings;
  • day care facilities and schools;
  • places of worship;
  • colleges and universities; and,
  • sports and concert venues.

Post Signs

Post signs at entrances to buildings, break rooms, cafeterias, and bathrooms with basic hygiene tips. The intent is to let your employees, occupants, and visitors know that you are considering the seriousness of the threat and are acting in the form of communication and implementation of preventative measures.

Simple signs are preferred to signs with excessive, detailed, or technical information.
Signs with illustrations have proven to be very effective. In multilingual communities, signs should reflect the common languages spoken. The CDC offers several versions of signs, posters, and handouts on its website at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/communication/factsheets.html

Preventing Illness

We all have a part to play in contributing to a healthy community by preventing the spread of infectious illnesses. While there is no vaccine to prevent COVID-19 infection, the following are everyday habits that can help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses.

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer that contains at least 70% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover you cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

In some cases, it may be useful to indicate the frequency of cleaning and disinfection on the signs. For instance, you can indicate that frequently touched surfaces are disinfected on a daily basis, periodically throughout the day, or continuously throughout the day.

Establish Hand Sanitizing Stations

Hand sanitizing stations should be placed in high visibility areas to encourage use. They can be set up in:

  • areas of heavy traffic;
  • entrances into buildings;
  • break rooms;
  • cafeterias;
  • coffee stations;
  • check-out counters;
  • reception areas;
  • shopping cart corrals/storage areas; and,
  • any other location that makes sense for your building.

The hand sanitizing stations can consist simply of wall-mounted dispensers or standalone dispensers. Sanitizing wipes may be appropriate in some locations as well. Ensure that sanitizer levels are frequently checked. Promptly replace empty supplies. Similarly, soap dispensers in bathrooms and kitchens should be promptly replaced or refilled, as needed.

Disinfection of Frequently Contacted Surfaces or Objects (FCSO)

Surfaces and objects that are frequently touched by employees, occupants, or visitors at your building may include:

  • doors and door handles;
  • keyboards and desks;
  • seating areas;
  • sinks and sink handles;
  • handrails;
  • drinking fountains;
  • shopping carts;
  • touch screens;
  • all bathroom surfaces;
  • merchandise racks and display cases/shelves;
  • refrigerators and microwave ovens;
  • copiers and printers;
  • check-out counters and registers;
  • food service areas;
  • desks;
  • tables and counters; and,
  • many others.

Proactively engage in disinfection activities of FCSOs at your building. The frequency of disinfection and cleaning should be at least daily. In buildings with high population densities or heavy foot traffic, it is advisable to perform disinfection and cleaning of FCSOs more frequently, up to several times per day.

Per the CDC, any product selected for disinfection and cleaning should be registered through the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA’s) emerging viral pathogen (EVP) program for use against SARS-CoV-2, indicating its effectiveness for cleaning surfaces with the virus. Alternatively, products that meet the criteria for designation in the EVP program can also be considered for use.

A list of products that are currently registered through the EPA in the EVP program can be found at:

https://www.epa.gov/pesticide-registration/list-n-disinfectants-use-against-sars-cov-2. Some of the products are designated as ready-to-use, are dilutable, or are wipes. Many can be applied through wiping, spraying, misting. Fogging is not permissible for some products. Any product selected for disinfection and cleaning should be used in strict accordance with the manufacturer’s instructions. It is a Violation of Federal Law to use a product in a manner inconsistent with its labeling. Select the product that is most suitable for the FCSO.

Determining the Best Course of Action for Your Building

Every building is unique in terms of population density, traffic patterns, use, etc. Encourage local property, site, personnel, or store managers to provide input about a particular building’s characteristics and use patterns. This will help to establish an action plan that works best for each location.

Plan Ahead!

Preparedness activities should include consultation with a qualified cleaning contractor, industrial hygienist, and state or local Departments of Health, among others. In the case of an outbreak, these resources may not be available to you in a timely manner if you haven’t established contractual relationships or partnerships with these resources in advance of an event.
A written preparedness plan is always recommended. Ensure that your property, site, personnel, or store managers are familiar with the elements of the plan so that it can be executed efficiently. To the extent possible, stockpile appropriate sanitization products, cleaning supplies, and basic personal protective equipment (PPE) needed for an initial response in your building(s). Once again, in the event of an outbreak or threat of an outbreak, these supplies may not be readily available if you have not properly planned.

Confirmed or Suspected Case(s) of Biological Contamination in Your Building

If it is determined that an employee, occupant, or visitor at your location has tested positive for COVID-19 infection, or is suspected of being infected, immediately contact your state’s Department of Health or the CDC for guidance on initiating the proper response.

If you feel your facility may have been exposed to the Coronavirus or are struggling with the influenza virus, please contact Mold Control Solutions and Indoor Air Care (904) 887-0272 to schedule a consultation for disinfection services. You can also email us at michaeld.mcsiac@gmail.com.